The iconic rapper, otherwise known as The Notorious B.I.G., grew up in the ‘one-room shack’ in Brooklyn’s Clinton Hill.

Classic rap fans have a chance to relive their young fan dreams — the home where The Notorious B.I.G. grew up was just listed as a $4,000-a-month rental.

As first reported by Curbed, Compass agents Fabienne Lecole and Grant Fodiman listed the 972-square-foot Brooklyn, New York, apartment where rapper Christopher Wallace, more commonly known as The Notorious B.I.G., or even Biggie Smalls, spent the early years of his life as a rental.

Courtesy of Compass

The house is located at 226 Saint James Place in Brooklyn’s Clinton Hill — the same part of the street was recently given the alternate name of “Christopher Wallace Way” in honor of the rapper. Wallace has even referred to the apartment as a “one-room shack” in his song “Juicy.”

But in 2019, the apartment is far from a shack — it has three bedrooms, one bathroom, high ceilings, hardwood floors and some office space. The four-story pre-war building in which the apartment is located also has a common roof deck, a garden and a barbecue area. Pets, however, are not allowed.

Courtesy of Compass

“The unit is an iconic historical gem as it served as the childhood home of the most famous rapper of all-time, Notorious B.I.G.,” Lecole told Inman. “It was recently renovated to provide modern conveniences while keeping its distinct and gorgeous pre-war details.”

Wallace, who was born and raised in Brooklyn, rose to fame during the East Coast/West Coast hip hop wars of the 1990s. His music is considered a classic of the rap genre. After Wallace was killed in a drive-by shooting in 1997, the album released two weeks later rose to first place on numerous albums charts.

Courtesy of Compass

Still, a lot has changed in Clinton Hill since Wallace lived in the neighborhood and drew inspiration from growing up in what was once a rough part of Brooklyn, these days the median home listed in Clinton Hill costs $770,000.

“It is undeniable that when you hear the story of Brooklyn, that we have a story that no other city in the world has: It is a story of triumph,” New York Council member Laurie Cumbo said at an event celebrating the naming of the street. “During the time that Biggie created masterpieces, this neighborhood was red-lined. People didn’t want to live here. People moved out of the neighborhood. They had left us to die.”